Property Value

Property Value

The office must annually estimate the true cash, or market, value of all real and personal property not exempt by law as of December 31. All such property is accordingly assessed the following year at one-half of its true cash or market value as required by state statute and the City Charter. This assessed value ultimately becomes the state equalized value, which, subject to statutory provisions, may become the taxable value against which millage rates are applied on tax bills by local taxing authorities for operating revenues. 

Property owners are encouraged to review the property information used to determine the value of their property. Property information can be found using the Parcel Information link below. After clicking the link, property search options will be listed in the left margin. Users can search by property owner name, property address, or by parcel number.

If you have questions about your property information or assessment, please contact the Assessing Department at any time of the year. The City Assessor only maintains records for properties located within the City of Monroe jurisdiction. The City consists of approximately 7,500 real (land and buildings) and 1,200 personal (business machinery, equipment, furniture, etc.) property parcels, about which individual information is available. Real property sales data is maintained in spreadsheet format.

Principle Residence Exemptions
In the State of Michigan, a primary residence is exempted from the State Education Tax. In order to qualify for exemption, a Principal Residence Homestead Exemption Affidavit must be filed with the City Assessing Office.

Property Sales and Transfers
Except for certain qualifying circumstances, property that is sold or transferred must be reported to the City Assessing Office using the State of Michigan Property Transfer Affidavit form.

Available Property and Buildings 
City-owned property available for sale is listed here. Contact the City Manager's Office  by letter or e-mail to initiate a request to purchase.

Board of Review

An ad valorem, or value-based, tax may invite disputes relative to the value of one's property. A taxpayer who believes that the assessed value placed on his or her property does not approximate one half of its true cash or market value may appeal to the Board of Review at a scheduled appointment during meetings which take place in early March.

Assessment change notices are mailed, and newspaper notices are published, in February. A further appeal may be made to the Michigan Tax Tribunal after a Board of Review appeal.

If a property owner is not satisfied by the action taken by the City Board of Review, a further appeal may be made to the Michigan Tax Tribunal.